Sunday, July 31, 2011

Terminator Squad 2

Yesterday I glued together and undercoated the Space Marine Terminator Squad.  Today, I spent about three hours painting the first miniature.  I needed to get some black paint as I had accidentally knocked over the pot of Chaos Black, and the remnant had begun to harden, so I headed off to the local Games Workshop store.  I know that the paints and things can be bought on-line and you can use non-Citadel paints that are cheaper, but I do prefer to support the local store when I can.

In addition to the paint, I purchased some PVA glue and the "burnt grass" material for the base.

One thing I have found in yesterday and today is that as mediocre as I think I am at painting these miniatures, I am worse at photography.  I am using a $70 Sony  Cybershot, but I find I just can't get the pictures to come out particularly well.  The exposure is usually not right, and parts are out of focus.  A proper SLR and a bit of knowledge about lighting would probably be helpful.  Anyone out there who can give advice on photographing small objects with lots of colour variation?

Anyhow, on with the painting.  I took a few photos of the steps along the way, but once the detail painting began, if I took a photo every time there would be a million of them, so these are the main highlights.

I paint at my kitchen table.  It is near the back door, so I get good natural light.  I set up with my paints and brushes and get to work.


I am sticking pretty close to the colour scheme on the box.  With a black undercoat, the white areas can be a problem, so the first thing I did was a quick wash with white on those areas and let it dry.  Then a second wash coat of white went on.


Next, the first coat of Ultramarine Blue. While waiting for the white to dry, you may notice the I did the red part of the seal on the left leg.


So once the large Ultramarine Blue areas are done, I started painting the weapons in Boltgun Metal.  The Boltgun Metal on the weapons was then drybrushed with black to take away some of the shine.  Then the fine details.  Red eyes and red lights, gold for the eagle on the side of the storm bolter.  The next image from the back, you can see many of the details.  PVA glue was added to the base and dipped in the "scorched grass" material.



I have left the final image in full resolution, as I am pretty happy with how it turned out. Click on it to get a closer view.  I overpainted the chest, eyes, belt buckle and the attached sigil with a gloss varnish to bring out the highlights.


The book on painting Citadel miniatures advises that if you are building an army, to paint the miniatures in a kind of production line.  That is, do the same areas on all the models at the same time.  I don't do it that way; I like to paint each model individually.  This is partly because I'm not making an army, I am painting to relax.  In addition, I like to learn from each one I do to get better for the next one.  So with this squad, I will work my way through, learning as I go, until I get to the sergeant with his war banner and intricate insignia.

Anyway, let me know what you think.  I'll probably just post images of the others finished individually as I go over the next week or so.

1 comment:

  1. Coming along very nicely! I like the grass you bought.

    Macros? That depends on how carried away you want to get. More light will always make it easier. A faster lens and/or a tripod will also help. Then you can get a specialised lens like the Nikkor 105mm.... :-)

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